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Mold Air Sampling

We Can See What You Breathe

Complaints of persistent respiratory illnesses may be a sign of airborne mold contamination. Molds are able to produce spores that can be carried on drafts throughout a building. The inhalation of these spores can lead to allergic reactions and flu like symptoms.


If the Mold Samplers determine that airborne mold is a problem in your building, we may recommend air monitoring. We will measure airborne concentrations of mold spores inside your building and compare it to the concentrations of mold on the outside of your building. To save money, we will often start a project taking non-viable samples. If warranted, we may proceed to viable sampling.

"We must be able to respond to our customers in a fast and responsive manner when mold is suspected of being a problem. Prohibiting mold and its adverse health effects should be our principal goal."

Mr. Douglas B. Kochanowski
Project Manager
All Phase Environmental Inc.

  • Substrate Samples
    A piece of the substrate (drywall, cabinet, etc.) is taken with the suspect mold intact. The sample is sealed in a plastic bag and sent to one of our third party analytical laboratories for analysis for mold spores. This test provides good data on the presence or absence of mold on a surface.
  • Wipe Samples
    A surface suspected of having mold growth is wiped with a pre-moistened cotton swab. The swab is placed in a sealed tube with a liquid solution and sent to one of our third party analytical laboratories for analysis for mold spores. This test provides good data on the presence or absence of mold on a surface and is often used for post removal testing.
  • Tape Lift
    A surface with visible mold growth is sampled with a strip of clear sticky tape. The tape is placed over the mold affected area and pressed down to stick the sample to the tape. The tape is placed on a clean glass microscope slide, sealed in a plastic container and sent to one of our third party analytical laboratories for analysis for mold spores. Test results allow us to make estimates on the concentration of mold spores on a given surface area.
  • Dust Samples
    Dust can be collected using a variety of methods and placed in a sealed bag and sent to one of our third party analytical laboratories for analysis for mold spores. This test provides good data on the presence or absence of mold disseminated throughout a home or office.
  • Soil Samples
    Mold can be found in the crawlspaces of homes and buildings. Soil is collected in glass jars and sealed air tight. The jars are sent to one of our third party analytical laboratories for analysis for mold spores. This test provides data on the presence or absence of mold is soil.
  • Vacumn Samples
    Carpet can often be a breeding ground for mold. A cassette with a micro cellulose ester filter is connected to a high-flow air sampling pump. A one-square foot area of carpeting is vacuumed with the sample cassette. Dust and mold spores found deep in the carpet are sucked into the sample cassette. The cassette is sealed airtight and sent to one of our third party analytical laboratories for analysis for mold spores. This test provides good data on the presence or absence of mold and gives a rough idea of concentrations in areas with carpeting.


Non-Viable Sampling Methods

Wipe, tape lift, dust, air, soil or vac samples that are analyzed to determine the presence or absence of mold, and concentration of the mold spores found. Data from non-viable samples does not provide insight on which the type of mold is present or its toxicity.


Viable Sampling Methods

Mold samples are taken with the intent to grow and incubate the captured mold in a laboratory environment. This enables the analyst to define the species of mold, its concentration and its potential toxicity.